Multitasking Sheet Pans

Measuring a trim 9 by 13 inches, quarter-sheet pans—sometimes called “small jelly-roll pans”—are handy for roasting foods with different cooking times. (Two sheets fit side by side in an oven.) Look at what else they’re great for. 1. Corralling Recipe Ingredients Want someone else to start dinner? Gather meat, vegetables, and other perishables the recipe...
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Prettier Slaws (Chop-Chop)

Sure, your food processor is a whiz at grating vegetables…into short, stubby pieces. The next time you pull it out to make a slaw or a salad, try this trick for creating slender, elegant strands: Cut carrots, broccoli, or apples into pieces the same width as the feed tube (about 4 to 5 inches, usually)...
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Removing Salmon Bones

Before salmon fillets make it into the supermarket seafood case, the fishmonger has taken out the backbone and the ribs. But he doesn’t always catch the thin, soft pin bones that “float” in the flesh. Here’s a quick way to remove them at home. Step 1: Run your index finger along the center seam of...
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Trimming Green Beans in a Snap

Sitting with a bushel of beans and carefully pinching the ends off each one can be quite relaxing—if you’re sitting on a porch swing on a lazy afternoon. But if you have a cluttered countertop and 15 minutes until dinner, try this technique instead. Step 1. Line up the stems. The beans’ tough, knobby ends...
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How to Chop Garlic

No more struggling with sticky, paper-thin peels. With these three steps-trim, crush, chop-you can prep a clove in no time. Step 1: Trim. Use the tip of a chef’s knife to slice off the hard root of each clove. This will allow the skin to peel away more easily. Step 2: Crush. Place a clove...
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Taking Your Oven’s Temperature

Ovens can lie. Yours may say 350° F, but your last batch of brownies was squishy even though you followed the baking time. What gives? After a while, ovens may lose accuracy, running up to 25 degrees too hot or cool. To test yours, place an oven-safe thermometer on the middle rack and heat the...
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A Cleaner Way to Crack an Egg

When you tap an egg on the edge of a bowl, you don’t break just the shell. The thin membrane surrounding the white and the yolk also ruptures, so tiny shell shards can mix with the liquid and end up in your finished dish. (Worst omelet ingredient ever.) Instead, crack the egg on a flat...
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Mastering Whipped Cream

Getting soft peaks—and not going too far (oops, butter!)—is easy if you use these three tips. 1. Start with the right ingredients. For fluffy, stable whipped cream, use cartons labeled “heavy cream,” “whipping cream,” or “heavy whipping cream.” (Save the light cream for coffee.) For sweetness, add 2 tablespoons granulated sugar per cup of cream...
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Making Stronger Iced Coffee and Tea

All too often, iced brews concocted at home are weak and watery—a total buzzkill. That’s because simply mixing your regular coffee or tea with ice dilutes its intensity. Fortunately, it’s easy to give your drink more muscle: Make it double-strength. For coffee, use ¼ cup ground beans for every cup of water; for tea, use...
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How to Grill Corn

It’s hard to beat the smoky-sweet flavor of fresh corn cooked on a grill. Here’s how to do it. Step 1. Pull the husks back from the corn, but leave them attached at the stem. Remove and discard the silks. Step 2. Pull the husks back up around the corn. Soak the ears in a...
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